How to Improve Your Medical Facility for Your Patients

If you’ve been looking for viable upgrades to improve your patients’ experience and recovery in your medical facility, then you came to the right place. A hospital facility is a special building, so it makes sense why many hospital owners or managers find it difficult to find effective upgrades that don’t require an immense amount of planning or finances. Lucky for you, there are relatively simple and inexpensive upgrades you can make in your facility to boost service delivery. They include the following:

Improve the ambience in the patients’ rooms
Hospital rooms dedicated to patients tend to be small and dull. It’s not uncommon to find gray or green walls, and poor lighting in the rooms, and that’s why many people don’t like being in medical facilities. There’s nothing wrong with upgrading your hospital rooms to resemble the comfortable hotel rooms. You can have walls that incorporate soothing colors, add pictures depicting beautiful nature scenes, and increase the space for your patients’ visitors. Such simple improvements are enough to boost the mood, satisfaction and happiness in your patients, and encourage the presence of your patients’ support network. You can also include a window to allow your patients to view nature and receive more sunlight. According to a Psychosomatic Medicine study that was conducted in 2005, patients who receive more sunlight require fewer painkillers, reducing the medical costs by 21%.

Improve your surgical lighting
You should also make lighting upgrades in your surgical rooms to improve visibility for your surgeons; doing so can boost their efficiency. If you’ve not attained the right hospital lighting standards in your facility, your surgeons can make mistakes that may put your patients’ lives at risk. Moreover, the medical officers are likely to be less productive in poorly lit environments due to eye and neck strain, and the resulting fatigue. You should therefore invest in lighting systems that strike a good balance between shadow dilution, brightness, volume and temperature to optimize visibility.

Invest in big data
One of the best ways of improving patient outcomes in your medical facility is investing in a method that reduces the risk of human error. With neural networks, you can improve your diagnostic process by analyzing a wide range of data. As you know, data is a great way to predict the course of various diseases; it can assist your medical professionals reduce the patients’ likelihood of developing fresh complications. You can also use data strategically to streamline your workflows. For instance, you can boost your operating room schedule by analyzing your hospital records, making your team members more productive.

Reduce the noise
Medical facilities tend to be noisy due to things like overhead paging, staff discussions and nighttime vitals checks. According to research, noise in hospitals can increase a patient’s anxiety, disrupt their sleep, affect pain management and lead to blood pressure spikes. In most medical facilities, the acoustics rarely reduce the noise effectively; luckily, there are easy ways to quiet the building. You can install sound-absorbing tiles and retrofit older environments within the building for minimal noise. What’s more, you can educate your staff on the importance of quietness in boosting patient comfort, healing and satisfaction.

Moreover, you can check your electronic devices, like monitors and alarm systems, and ensure that they’re not a source of noise and stress to your patients. If you have to, replace your devices with quieter ones. Of course, avoid scheduling housekeeping, maintenance or other operations in the evening hours.

Establish private rooms
You can increase your patients’ recovery by providing them access to private rooms. This relatively simple intervention can assist reduce your patients’ stress and comfort, make it easy for them to sleep and recover. One Canadian study found that each roommate a patient gets increases their chances of getting a superbug by 10%. Remember that privacy and dignity are important factors to patients too. For instance, having a private room can encourage the presence of your patients’ loved ones, leading to more comfort, less stress and better patient satisfaction.

Conclusion
If you are thinking of improving your medical care, you should implement the techniques discussed above to increase your chances of success. In summary, improve the ambience in the patients’ rooms, boost your surgical lighting, invest in big data, reduce the noise and try to ensure your patients access private rooms. All these methods can improve employee and patient satisfaction tremendously.

Sad Sales Negotiators Do a Bad Job

In the quest to do a better job at negotiating deals, sales negotiators have been known to do some pretty wild things in order to condition themselves to perform at a high level – extreme exercising, exposure to hot / cold temperatures, and even eating some pretty weird things. However, is it possible that they’ve been overlooking the most important thing – how happy they are?

The Power Of Sad

Dr. Robert Cialdini has spent a lot of time studying how we can persuade others and how they can persuade us. In fact he’s written a popular book on the topic titled Influence: Science and Practice in which he talks about what causes us to do things that we may not be giving a lot of thought to.

When it comes to sales negotiations, Dr. Cialdini and his peers have done some interesting studies that should cause all of us to sit up and take notice.

The Big Guess

The social scientist who were doing the research started with the hypothesis that when we get sad, we get motivated to do something to change our current circumstances in order to get out of our sad mood.

They took this thinking one step further. They also guessed that sad buyers would be willing to pay higher prices for a given product and sad sellers would be willing to sell a product for a lower price.Ã’Â Do I have your interest now?

The Experiment

The cool thing about being a social scientist is that you get to test your hypothesis on people, not rats. In this case the scientists had their (human) test subjects divided into two groups. One group watched a sad movie and then wrote a paragraph about how the movie made them feel. The other group watched a movie about fish (!) and then wrote about what they had done that day.

Next, both groups were once again divided into two groups and one group was asked to mark on a piece of paper what price they would sell an item at and the other group was asked to mark on a piece of paper what price they would buy an item at.

What the scientist discovered just might scare you. It turns out that their original guess was right: sad buyer ended up being willing to spend 30% more for an item than emotionally neutral buyers. Likewise, sad sellers were willing to sell an item for 33% less than emotionally neutral sellers. The really spooky part of all of this is that the sad buyers and sellers had no idea that their sadness had affected them so much.

Final Thoughts

Although we often get caught up in preparing for our next sales negotiation, what the social scientists have discovered is that we bring everything else that is going on in our lives to the table with us. On a similar note, the other side of the negotiating table does the exact same thing.

Before you start your next sales negotiation, you need to take a minute or two and evaluate how you are feeling. If there is anything that is bringing you down or making you depressed, then you have got to try to find a way to resolve it or at least make it better before the negotiations start. Learn to do this and it will allow you to close better deals and close them quicker.

Your Presentation Skills May Be Great, But What About the Sound of Your Speaking Voice?

I have belonged to a public speaking network for some time now and it never ceases to amaze me that the members do not talk about the actual sound of the speaking voice. From topics covering the value of content versus delivery to the elimination of nervousness and even ways to find speaking engagements, they never discuss the image of the voice and what it says about them.

If your delivery is dynamic but your diction is hard to understand, then it really doesn’t matter how great your presentation skills because your audience is left unable to receive your message. Perhaps you speak too softly and they cannot hear you comfortably. On the other hand, maybe you are too loud and your sound being amplified by a speaker is painful to your listeners’ ears.

Your voice may be excessively nasal, whiny, shrill, wimpy, young-sounding, old-sounding, hoarse, gravelly, quivering, or just plain unattractive. What do you think any one of those characteristics would say about you? As a public speaker, your voice is the vehicle for your words. If you take courses in and read articles about presentation skills, would you not want to do something about your vocal image – that which is transporting your message? (By the way, I’m talking about the voice you hear on your answering machine, not the one you hear in your head!)

What is fascinating is that we all have a better voice inside, we’re just not aware of it. It is richer, warmer, deeper in pitch, resonant, and has the ability to be projected without shouting. In addition, your ‘real’ voice – versus your habitual one – can last for greater lengths of time without doing damage to your throat and vocal folds (cords). This is known as vocal abuse and is common among politicians and public speakers. Hilary Clinton and Anthony Robbins are two very good examples of vocal abuse. The latter’s voice has deteriorated to such a degree that he needs steroids in order to speak for great lengths of time. That should never have happened.

Voice training is something all public speakers should consider because the voice is truly the fundamental, the building block. Everything else is the icing on the cake. Without a voice, there is no public speaking. Without the cake, the icing really doesn’t matter.

I discovered my real voice many years ago and it is only improving with age. It’s a marvelous feeling to have total control over your voice no matter what the situation. What image is your voice projecting?